Tips for Surviving the End of Daylight Saving Time


Cher-Turn-Back-2

Yes I am still using this tired old meme. No I do not regret it. 

It’s that time of year again! When it gets dark earlier in the evening and stays dark later in the morning and basically it’s just dark dark dark all day long, for the next six months. That’s how it feels anyway. And hey, let’s make it worse by pushing time back an hour!! Great idea Ben-Freaking-Franklin. You couldn’t just leave well enough alone could you? Sure, we appreciate that extra hour in summer but seeing as how it screws with all of humanity and our circadian rhythms twice a year, I’m thinking it wasn’t such a great idea after all.

I just happened to find a helpful email in my inbox yesterday and I thought I’d share it (with permission) with you, my six remaining readers. ❤  Full disclosure, I know nothing about this doctor – her PR company sent me this article, but I thought the tips were helpful and practical and worth sharing here.

***********************************************************************************

Lose Daylight Without Losing Your Mojo

Neuropsychologist Offers Practical Tips to Prepare for the Clock Change

www.comprehendthemind.com

That post-summer sluggishness usually kicks in every October as we head into fall. The temperatures drop and the one thing that makes winter’s rapid approach evident regardless of climate is the loss of daylight. For many, this loss of daylight also leads to a loss of energy, an uptick in short temper and even bouts of depression. So how can we ease into the rapidly approaching winter months? Dr. Sanam Hafeez, an NYC based licenses clinical psychologist and faculty member at the prestigious Columbia University Teachers College, offers practical tips to prepare for the clock change.

Before we get into the tips, it’s important to understand the clock change’s impact on our brains and therefore our bodies, so we understand what is actually going on. Dr. Sanam Hafeez explains that “a cell in the retinas of our eyes called a ganglion cell contains the photopigment melanopsin. When we are exposed to sunlight, melanopsin signals a pathway to cells in the hypothalamus specifically responsible for regulating our bodies biological functions. This process then triggers the pineal gland which is in charge of melatonin secretion which peaks at night and wears off during the day. In simpler terms, the less light exposure we get, more out of whack we feel.”

According to Dr. Hafeez, the following simple adjustments leading up to the clock falling back can make a significant difference for those who don’t struggle with more severe depression or bipolar disorder.

1. Avoid alcohol.

When the clocks are turned back in the fall, many bars stay open an additional hour. This is typically celebrated by people in their 20’s and 30’s who only pay for it the next day opting to sleep away their Sunday. Drinking alcohol before turning back the clocks can add more sluggishness the next morning. “Even with just a one-hour clock change, our body’s circadian rhythm is thrown off making our brains a bit confused. Alcohol only heightens these effects,” explains Dr. Hafeez. Imagine the double whammy of a hangover after the fall back clock change?

2. Enjoy physical activity during the daytime.

The more time spent outside in the daylight doing physical activity, the less sluggish you will feel once the clocks fall back. Fall is a great time to powerwalk or go for a run. If you’re an early riser then you will love the earlier sunrise at least for the next few weeks. “A lot of people shift their exercise routines to include more high energy group workouts in the evenings to give themselves something to look forward to as a way to shake off the workday. You really want to pay attention to when you feel most energized and align your exercise to that,” suggests Dr. Hafeez.

3. Don’t sleep in. Go to bed earlier instead.

In the days leading up to the clock change, add extra “wind-down” time before bed and get to bed an hour earlier. On the Sunday morning of the clock change, people mistakenly opt to sleep in. You really want to stick to the same wake-up time while getting to bed earlier. That’s the key according to Dr. Hafeez. “People think they are gaining an hour of sleep, they’re not because at bedtime they’re losing it. When you keep the wake-up time and get to bed earlier that extra hour isn’t felt as much the next day,” explains Dr. Hafeez.

4. Avoid watching the news before bed.

People think that getting to bed an hour earlier means it’s ok to watch TV in bed before sleep. TV or any kind stimulates the brain. Your favorite show causes you to focus when you’re trying to shut down stimulation. The news is even worse. You get wrapped up in the doom and gloom watching the news. “If you want to really make sure you still wake up refreshed, opt for tranquil music or guided meditations available on YouTube or an app, recommends Dr. Hafeez.”

5. Plan ahead! Consider taking Monday off!

For those who find their mood is negatively impacted after the fall clock change, consider taking Monday off and make it about self-care. Waking up early, taking advantage of the early light, enjoying a healthy breakfast, getting a massage or catching up on reading, tidying and whatever you feel necessary to feel good, do it. “People can feel the effects of the clock change for up to 3 weeks. Taking a day off to focus on your own well-being can become a nice post clock change ritual,” she says.

About the Doctor:

Dr. Sanam Hafeez PsyD is an NYC based licensed clinical psychologist, teaching faculty member at the prestigious Columbia University Teacher’s College and the founder and Clinical Director of Comprehensive Consultation Psychological Services, P.C. a neuropsychological, developmental and educational center in Manhattan and Queens. Dr. Hafeez masterfully applies her years of experience connecting psychological implications to address some of today’s common issues such as body image, social media addiction, relationships, workplace stress, parenting and psychopathology (bipolar, schizophrenia, depression, anxiety, etc…). In addition, Dr. Hafeez works with individuals who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), learning disabilities, attention and memory problems, and abuse. Dr. Hafeez often shares her credible expertise to various news outlets in New York City and frequently appears on CNN and Dr.Oz.

Connect with Dr.Hafeez via Instagram @drsanamhafeez or www.comprehendthemind.com

 

Categories: writing

4 comments

  1. I change the clocks on Saturday afternoon. Sometime between 2-4pm.

    (Could put a piece of tape over clock on phone and TV.)

    This works like a charm for me. I then do not notice the change all.

    When we fly long distance, multiple time zones, We stay up when we land and then go to bed and get up, based on the new time zone. And do not have jet lag.

    We live in Indiana where we did not have daylight savings time until 2005. So I have lived with it and without it. And everyone I know (here) would prefer going back to no time change. Everyone I know really hates the whole thing.

  2. I wish they would stop it. I feel like it is another reminder that winter is almost here.

  3. I am anal/retentive and change my clocks early in the day and don’t really notice. Living in West Virginia, it increases the likelihood of hitting a deer while driving since most of the time one is driving in the dark much more often. Such is life in WV.

  4. Since I am retired I don’t pay much attention to it. Just get up when it’s light and go to bed when it’s dark. Well, I don’t go to bed at 5:00😊. And, believe it or not, I never saw that Cher meme. Love it!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: